Summary Description

Any incident can have a mix of political, economic, social, environmental, and cost implications with potentially serious long-term effects.  Also, more and more incidents are multiagency and/or multijurisdictional.  As the Executive or Senior Official, you need to be aware of how ICS and interagency (regional) multiagency coordination systems can work to ensure cooperative response efforts.

How do I maintain control when an incident occurs?  As the Executive or Senior Official, you establish the overall policy, and provide guidelines on priorities, objectives, and constraints to a qualified Incident Commander.  In many agencies, this is done as a matter of policy through a written delegation of authority.

Where do I fit in the incident management process? ICS has a well-defined hierarchy of command.  After you have clearly articulated the policy you wish followed and delegated certain authorities, the Incident Commander who reports to you will have the necessary authority and guidance to manage the incident.  The Incident Commander is the primary person in charge at the incident.  In addition to managing the incident scene, he or she is responsible to keep you informed and up to date on all important matters pertaining to the incident.  Your continuing role is to ensure that you are informed and that your Incident Commander is functioning in a responsible manner.

Goals

The purpose of this course is to provide an orientation to the Incident Command System (ICS) for Executives and Senior Officials (including elected officials, city/county managers, agency administrators, etc.), including Incident Command System (ICS) principles and their role in supporting incident management.  This course is intended to provide a forum to discuss your organization’s strategic and executive-level preparedness and response issues and challenges related to incident management at all levels.  It is also intended to serve as a vehicle to share proven strategies and practices as well as enhanced teamwork and coordination among the organization’s senior officials responsible for emergency management.  Topics will include but not be limited to:

  • DEFINE THE ROLE OF AN EXECUTIVE RELATIVE TO THE ICS.
  • DESCRIBE THE VARIOUS WAYS ICS CAN BE APPLIED.
  • DESCRIBE THE BASIC ORGANIZATION OF ICS AND KNOW THE FUNCTIONAL RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE COMMAND AND GENERAL STAFFS.
  • DESCRIBE BASIC ICS TERMINOLOGY.
  • IDENTIFY THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN INCIDENT/EVENT ICS ORGANIZATIONS AND THE ACTIVITIES ACCOMPLISHED BY AREA COMMANDS, EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTERS (EOCS) AND MULTI-AGENCY COORDINATION SYSTEMS (MACS).
  • DESCRIBE THE MAJOR RESPONSIBILITIES OF AN EXECUTIVE AS RELATED TO AN INCIDENT/EVENT. (INCLUDE THE AGENCY ADMINISTRATOR BRIEFING AND DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY)
  • EXPLAIN THE ADMINISTRATIVE, LOGISTICAL, FINANCIAL AND REPORTING IMPLICATIONS OF LARGE INCIDENT/EVENT OPERATIONS.

Prerequisites

None required.